The biggest questions ever asked

November 21, 2006

To celebrate New Scientist magazine’s 50th birthday, we have decided to tackle the truly big questions, with the help of some of the leading lights in science.

Site – http://www.newscientist.com


Late Night Alumni

November 15, 2006

lna

The Late Night Alumni project came about when Finn heard Becky sing on a local Salt Lake City Christmas compilation and, impressed by what he heard, tracked her down to provide some vocals on a song he had recently written. After working on a couple songs together, they realized something special was happening. The combination of Finn’s dreamy yet solid production and Becky’s soft and sensual vocals seemed to be a match made in heaven. Seeing where the music was heading, Finn and Becky brought John into the fold to offer his expertise in strings, which served to give the tracks the lift and texture they needed. Ryan (probably the best known member of the collective, due primarily to his DJing and highly respected work, alongside his co-producer Finn, under the Kaskade guise) proved to be the final piece of the puzzle, with his years of acclaimed beat making providing the innovation that brings all the elements of the album together in fine style.

Site –  http://www.latenightalumni.com


Berners-Lee, universities launch ‘Web science’ initiative

November 7, 2006

Representatives from MIT and the University of Southampton have announced the Web Science Research Initiative (WSRI), a multidisciplinary project to study the social and technological implications of growing Web adoption.  Berners-Lee, who is also a senior research scientist at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), detailed the initiative with other organizers at MIT here on Thursday.  The universities intend to combine several disciplines, including social sciences, psychology and life sciences, with technology development.  The social aspect of the Web–and the Web’s huge impact on society–demands that a field separate from computer science be explored, organizers said.

Site – http://www.zdnetasia.com


Future Computing

November 3, 2006

Exploiting the quirks of the quantum world could revolutionize computing, allowing information processing at speeds beyond the wildest electric dreams of your humble PC. Quantum bits will use the most fundamental characteristic of atoms and light to store information and perform calculations. Meanwhile, new materials will improve conventional computers by helping to miniaturize components and handle data with laser beams instead of electrical circuits. News@nature.com rounds up the latest in this fast moving field of research.

Site – http://www.nature.com


Researchers teach computers how to name images by ‘thinking’

November 2, 2006

Penn State researchers have “taught” computers how to interpret images using a vocabulary of up to 330 English words, so that a computer can describe a photograph of two polo players, for instance, as “sport,” “people,” “horse,” “polo.” The new system, which can automatically annotate entire online collections of photographs as they are uploaded, means significant time-savings for the millions of Internet users who now manually tag or identify their images. It also facilitates retrieval of images through the use of search terms, said James Wang, associate professor in the Penn State College of Information Sciences and Technology, and one of the technology’s two inventors.

Site – http://physorg.com


Rerouting Brain Circuits with Implanted Chips

November 2, 2006

A new, implantable and wireless brain chip can create artificial connections between different parts of the brain, paving the way for devices that could reconnect damaged neural circuits. Scientists say the chip sheds light on the brain’s innate ability to rewire itself, and it could help explain our capacity to learn and remember new information. “We have a chance of manipulating and repairing [specific] regions of the brain that might be damaged,” says Joseph Pancrazio, director of the neural-engineering program at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in Bethesda, MD. “To be able to repair these kinds of lesions on a neuron-by-neuron basis is extraordinary.”

Site – http://www.technologyreview.com


Online Evolution

November 2, 2006

It’s easy to laugh now. A recent Wired magazine article on the Internet’s “10 years that changed the world” credits the statement to an ABC TV executive in 1989. But even 10 years ago, it’s likely that many people shared that view. Ten years ago, companies like Netscape had to explain what “browser” means; Yahoo! was more of a murmur than a shout; Amazon.com was mainly about books; and the two founders of Google were just your average Stanford students. In the blip of time since then, the Internet has revolutionized everyday life for millions of people around the world. Looking back over the last 10 years, the obvious question is: Where will the Internet take us in the future?

Site – http://www.cnn.com