Aging Partially Reversed in Mice

November 29, 2010

Scientists have partially reversed age-related degeneration in mice, an achievement that suggests a new approach for tackling similar disorders in people.

By tweaking a gene, the researchers reversed brain disease and restored the sense of smell and fertility in prematurely aged mice. Previous experiments with calorie restriction and other methods have shown that aspects of aging can be slowed. This appears to be the first time that some age-related problems in animals have actually been reversed.

Site – http://online.wsj.com


Long Live the Web

November 22, 2010

The world wide web went live, on my physical desktop in Geneva, Switzerland, in December 1990. It consisted of one Web site and one browser, which happened to be on the same computer. The simple setup demonstrated a profound concept: that any person could share information with anyone else, anywhere. In this spirit, the Web spread quickly from the grassroots up. Today, at its 20th anniversary, the Web is thoroughly integrated into our daily lives. We take it for granted, expecting it to “be there” at any instant, like electricity.

The Web evolved into a powerful, ubiquitous tool because it was built on egalitarian principles and because thousands of individuals, universities and companies have worked, both independently and together as part of the World Wide Web Consortium, to expand its capabilities based on those principles.

Site – http://www.scientificamerican.com


Antimatter Atoms Trapped for First Time

November 19, 2010

For the first time, scientists have trapped antimatter atoms—mysterious, oppositely charged versions of ordinary atoms—a new study says.

Though the achievement is “a big deal,” it doesn’t mean the antimatter bombs and engines of science fiction will be igniting anytime soon, experts say.

Site – http://news.nationalgeographic.com


What’s the Matter with the Higgs Boson?

November 17, 2010

The search is on for the Higgs boson, and it seems likely that soon we’ll find this mysterious particle that creates matter in the universe. But what if we don’t? In this week’s “Ask a Physicist,” we’ll find out.

The Higgs boson has the unique distinction of being the only particle in our standard model of particle physics that we haven’t yet discovered. We may be on the verge of detecting it in the next few years, and yet, for some reason, almost nobody has asked anything about it, even though I’ve been chomping at the bit to write about it.

Site – http://io9.com/