Singularity University

June 4, 2009

su

Singularity University, based on the NASA Ames campus in Silicon Valley, is an interdisciplinary university whose mission is to assemble, educate and inspire a cadre of leaders who strive to understand and facilitate the development of exponentially advancing technologies (bio, nano, info, AI, etc.), and apply, focus and guide these tools to address humanity’s grand challenges.

Site – http://singularityu.org

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The Singularity Summit 2007

August 29, 2007

In futures studies, the singularity represents an “event horizon” in the predictability of human technological development past which present models of the future cease to give reliable or accurate answers, following the creation of strong AI or the enhancement of human intelligence. Many futurists predict that after the singularity, humans as they exist presently won’t be the driving force in scientific and technological progress, eclipsed cognitively by posthumans, AI, or both, with all models of change based on past trends in human behavior becoming obsolete. While some regard the singularity as a positive event and work to hasten its arrival, others view the singularity as dangerous, undesirable, or unlikely. The most practical means for initiating the singularity are debated, as are how (or whether) the singularity can be influenced or avoided if dangerous. The Singularity Summit 2007 will explore these nuances. We invite you to join us.

Site – http://www.singinst.org


Ray Kurweil at the Killer App Confrence

June 8, 2007

Ray Kurzweil is a pioneer in the fields of optical character recognition, health, artificial intelligence, transhumanism, technological singularity and futurism. At the Killer App Expo in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Ray gave the evening Keynote speech. We were fortunate enough to have two HD cameras at the conference and grabbed the entire keynote with house audio. Whereas we would normally cut this 80 minute presentation into a 10 to 15 minute chunk, Ray’s material was so good, so inspiring that we have decided to leave it complete. If you’re an Apple TV user, this is a great bit to watch in full 720p. I hope you enjoy this as much as we did.

Site – http://www.technologyevangelist.com


3-D Nano Images

April 24, 2007

To image a protein or other biomolecule in three dimensions, the researchers hope to bring the resolution of the MRI method down to less than one nanometer so that they can pinpoint the location of individual atoms in a protein. Scientists could then reconstruct the protein’s structure. “In our dream, we’d be taking MRI 3-D images of all the atoms in a molecule,” Rugar says.

Site – http://www.technologyreview.com


22nd Century Technology

January 9, 2007

Ever wonder what the world is going to be like in the future? Will people routinely live to see their 250th birthdays? Will personal computers be smarter than us? (Or more personable?) Will machines shrink so small they can make repairs inside a human cell? Science fantasy or futuristic nightmare? 22nd Century takes you to the forefront of technology and hears from people on the cusp of a scientific revolution.

Site – http://www.pbs.org


The bootless PC and terabytes on a dime

September 20, 2006

Imagine a PC with instantaneous boot up or storing 10TB of data — 10,000 gigabytes — on a device the size of a dime with data-transfer rates unhampered by any latency. Those are just two examples of the promises that storage nanotechnologies hold: combining the functions of memory chips and disk drives on a single piece of hardware that is a fraction of the size of devices today. Nanotechnology, the science of engineering functional systems at the molecular scale, holds the possibility of billions of infinitesimally small machines working together to build products from the ground up using readily available materials.

Site – http://www.computerworld.com


Soft Machines

July 8, 2006

Soft Machines is a book about nanotechnology, published in the UK and the USA by Oxford University Press. The book, intended for the general reader, explains why things behave differently at the nanoscale to the way they behave at familiar human scales, and why this means that nanotechnology may be more like biology than conventional engineering.

Site – http://www.softmachines.org